» Guide to Facial Fillers

Guide to Facial Fillers

There are a large number of injectable fillers available for patients to utilize. Not all injectable fillers are the same, even injectables approved by the FDA may not have an excellent safety record. Dr. Shah only utilizes facial fillers which have been studied extensively and minimize any ris to the patient.

Facial Filler Philosophy

Safety is dependent on a skilled injector and utilization of appropriate injectable materials. Specific skin types often have improved results with specific types of facial fillers.  Dr. Shah utiilzes a conservative approach in facial fillers. He utilzies fillers which have a proven track record of safety and minimal complications.

Many physicians from a variety of fields inject facial fillers.  However, there is an art to successful use of facial fillers.  An analogy can be made between hair stylists and application of facial fillers.  A successful hair cut brings new life into not just the hair but the entire face itself.  With facial fillers, standard applications of facial fillers can lead to flat results which do not create the desired visual impact.  With the appropriate application of facial fillers, the entire face appears younger, balanced, and more refreshed. 

Specific applications of facial fillers can be used to augment the malar region (also known as the cheekbone) to create a subtle but discernable difference in cheekbone height creating a more youthful appearance.  There is little to no downtime with facial fillers and they serve an important role in rejuvenation of the aging face.

Dr. Shah has learned from several master injectors of the face including a world famous facial plastic surgeon in Beverly Hills.  This approach is known to a handful of surgeons in the world and is heavily guarded.  Dr.  Shah does not describe any of these techniques on this website or in the scientific community due to the strict confidence in which these techniques have been taught.

 

Name Date Approved by FDA Main Component Skin Testing Required? Allergy Components Side Effects How long does it last? Onset of results
Radiesse August 2006 Calcium Hydroxyapatite  no minimal Possible, Not reversible, can not be used in lips or nose, 8 months -3 years immediate

Elevess  July 2007 Hyaluronic
Acid
no Not to be used in patients with lidocaine sensitivity, gram positive bacterial proteins Local reaction, swelling 4-6 months immediate

Juvederm Ultra Plus June 2006 Hyaluronic
Acid
no Gram positive bacterial proteins   Local reaction, swelling 4-6 months immediate

Juvederm Ultra June 2006 Hyaluronic
Acid
no Gram positive bacterial proteins   Local reaction, swelling 4-12 months immediate

Perlane   May 2007 NASHA
(non-animal hyaluronic acid)
no Gram positive bacterial proteins   Local reaction, swelling 4-12 months immediate

Restylane December 2003 NASHA
(non-animal hyaluronic acid)
no Gram positive bacterial proteins   Local reaction, swelling 4-6 months immediate

Sculptra August 2004  Poly-L-
Lactic Acid
no Possible granuloma formation, possible nodule formation, not reversible 8 months- 2 years  immediate

Cosmoplast 2003 collagen derived from human no Not to be used in patients with lidocaine sensitivity allergy 1-6 months immediate

Hydrelle Late 2009 Hyaluronic
Acid
no Sulfites
(Red wine derviatives ) 
local reaction swelling, granuloma 4-12 months immediate

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